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MEDIEVAL JOUSTING TOURNAMENT

25th, 26th and 27th May 2019

England vs France 

WITNESS MEDIEVAL RIVALRY

Thrill at the sight of armoured knights representing both countries competing for the Leeds Castle International Cup on powerful combat horses across four challenging events!

This event is included with the price of admission.


In partnership with:

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ABOUT THE TOURNAMENT

Competing over three days for the coveted Leeds Castle International Cup, a team of five skilled fighters from France will battle against five brave competitors from England, each with their own horse and precious armour.

Points will be accumulated across all three days, with the Cup being awarded to the highest scoring team. The tournament consists of four challenging events, each demonstrating strength and ability.


Foot Combat with Sword

Mounted Skill at Arms

The Mounted Melee

The Joust

BEYOND THE ARENA

Across the three days of the tournament there will be other medieval events and activities to entertain, educate and thrill.

THE KNIGHTS

The English

Mark Caple

Andy Deane

Andreas Wenzel

Ciaran Povey

Valentin-Timur Catuneanu

The French

Alexandre de Lamballes

Quentin de Grand Lieux

Arnaud de St Esprit

Meril de la Touque

Florent de Verdun

ENGLISH HORSES

 

Burt

 

Rodney

 

Tequila

 

Pinkerton

 

Donk

 

Magyar

FRENCH HORSES

 

Lord

 

Bob

 

John

 

Lucky

UNDERSTANDING THE RULES OF THE TOURNAMENT 

Along with his horse, each competitor is required to provide a full, well-fitted and historically accurate harness of armour based on sources dated between 1450 and 1500. The Marshal for the Tournament will be the judge not only of every bash, crash, hit and pass, but also of the equipment used down to the last detail.

To understand in detail how the tournament will be fairly and historically judged, please read the rules.

HISTORY OF THE TOURNAMENT

Medieval Tournaments where knights fought in simulated cavalry battles with the purpose of defeating the opposing team, probably began in France in the 11th century. By the next century, the sport had become popular across Europe. Tournaments often last several days, usually in celebration of an important event such as a marriage or coronation.

By the 13th Century Jousting had become more prevalent as an event of the tournament. The name ‘joust’ originated from the Latin ‘juxtare’ which means ‘to meet’. This part of the event was likely fashioned in answer to the grander prominence of gallantry, chivalry and honour in the later Middle Ages. 

A noble knight was expected to demonstrate such qualities as martial prowess and noble debonair manners. Competitors with a criminal background or with a notorious reputation were barred from competing, leading to some knights to enter anonymously.